How I truly feel about taking a knee


#61

And the solution.

No players or team associates are allowed on the field until after the National Anthem.


#62

This is how I truly feel about overpaid jock straps kneeling for the anthem and disrespecting the American Flag. This was written by Ted Nugent and it reflects my thoughts precisely.

Take a little trip to Valley Forge in January. Hold a musket ball in your
fingers and imagine it piercing your flesh and breaking a bone or two.
There won’t be a doctor or trainer to assist you until after the battle, so
just wait your turn. Take your cleats and socks off to get a real
experience.

Then, take a knee on the beach in Normandy where man after American man
stormed the beach, even as the one in front of him was shot to pieces, the
very sea stained with American blood. The only blockers most had were the
dead bodies in front of them, riddled with bullets from enemy fire.

Take a knee in the sweat soaked jungles of Vietnam. From Khe Sanh to
Saigon, anywhere will do. Americans died in all those jungles. There was no
playbook that told them what was next, but they knew what flag they
represented. When they came home, they were protested as well, and
spit on for reasons only cowards know.

Take another knee in the blood drenched sands of Fallujah in 110 degree
heat. Wear your Kevlar helmet and battle dress. Your number won’t be
printed on it unless your number is up! You’ll need to stay hydrated but
there won’t be anyone to squirt Gatorade into your mouth. You’re on your
own.

There are a lot of places to take a knee where Americans have given their
lives all over the world. When you use the banner under which they fought
as a source for your displeasure, you dishonor the memories of those who
bled for the very freedoms you have. That’s what the red stripes mean. It
represents the blood of those who spilled a sea of it defending your
liberty.

While you’re on your knee, pray for those that came before you, not on a
manicured lawn striped and printed with numbers to announce every inch of
ground taken, but on nameless hills and bloodied beaches and sweltering
forests and bitter cold mountains, every inch marked by an American life
lost serving that flag you protest.

No cheerleaders, no announcers, no coaches, no fans, just American men
and women, delivering the real fight against those who chose to harm us,
blazing a path so you would have the right to “take a knee.” You haven’t
any inkling of what it took to get you where you are, but your “protest” is
duly noted. Not only is it disgraceful to a nation of real heroes, it
serves the purpose of pointing to your ingratitude for those who chose to
defend you under that banner that will still wave long after your jersey is
retired.

If you really feel the need to take a knee, come with me to church on
Sunday and we’ll both kneel before Almighty God. We’ll thank Him for
preserving this country for as long as He has We’ll beg forgiveness for our
ingratitude for all He has provided us. We’ll appeal to Him for
understanding and wisdom. We’ll pray for liberty and justice for all,
because He is the one who provides those things. But there will be no
protest. There will only be gratitude for His provision and a plea for His
continued grace and mercy on the land of the free and the home of the
brave. It goes like this, GOD BLESS AMERICA.

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#63

Every one of these grinning bastards should be fired and exiled to Iran.

That is a posed pictured if ever there was one. How imbecilic and easily led these meathead jocks are! The NFL can thank Colin Kaepernick for ruining the entire NFL.


#64

Well sure, they made a financial decision. But… taking a knee, facing the flag, with their hand on their hearts was disrespectful to nothing.


#65

Hand on heart

Yeah… they all got da hanz over dare hartz … Respectfully sitting on their overpaid azzes…
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And we see the respect it generates in others…

Like I told you before and you didn’t seem to understand what I meant… They are paid to be on that field… they are paid by the fans that buy the tickets and those who pay the cable fees to watch them. They have every right to take that pay and use it to raise awareness… they can take out full page ads in the NYTimes… they can come on here and state their case… but the fans… the ones who pay their salaries don’t want the disrespect on their dime… They don’t want these ‘roll models’ influencing their children…

Every fan gets one vote and what you call respectful is your one vote…


#66

Burning the flag is totally disrespectful…except in a flag retirement ceremony.


#67

Like Kapernick, they should be sidelined permanently with no one wanting the liability.

I suspect football will never return to it’s once popular place for Americans to watch. Finally people are realizing that the professional players in many sports are nothing but over paid spoiled little children throwing a temper tantrum. Much like the stars of Hollywood. All like to spout off few want to back the cause monetarily.


#68

Who cares? Black or white…you take a knee and I will react to that.

I don’t watch the NFL or NBA anymore.


#69

Nobody votes on freedom of speech. Why are you selective in what parts of the constitution is important to you??


#70

Well, as liberals have stressed with political correctness and their theory of ‘hate crimes’… freedom of speech very much seems to have the limits of those forced to listen. Without the paid for venue, they would actually have to put their own cash and time on the line.


#71

Go ahead and make political statements at work and see how long you keep you job especially if they are offensive to management.

p.s. They can do anything they want before they hit the field and after they leave the field.


#72

Free market! If they want it their way they may have to find another job.


#73

I think that may be true. I used to be a big NFL fan and 49ers fan. I’ve only watched the super bowl since these stupid ‘protests’ started, and as far as I’m concerned the 49ers can go to hell. They gave that clod Kaepernick their “most Inspirational” award and that was the end of the 49ers for me.


#74

Black peoples have no rights and should never protest. Trump won because of the WN.


#75

Why do you treat blacks as unintelligent human beings?


#76

The funny thing is, I find the national anthem at sporting events annoying. Bringing politics in, and giving the finger to America, was the last straw. That group kneel that Jerry Jones did with “America’s Team” was an abomination. The NFL can go to hell.


#77

People looking to be offended will be offended. We still had coach-led prayer before football games in the locker rooms in high school even though that was a big no no. Nobody raised cane about it. I wasn’t even religious and it didn’t bother me. The Jewish kids didn’t scream victimhood. Nobody felt the coaches were forcing their religion upon us. It was actually kind of nice to be gathered in relative silence for a couple minutes to gather your thoughts and recenter yourself and come together as a group before heading out into the stadium. We respected the coach so we respected his faith in God whether or not we shared it because we respected his faith in us as well, and it was just all part of the same bundle of decency the man possessed.


#78

If you were to make a political statement equivalent to taking a knee in front of the owners, stockholders in your company would your employer condone your actions?


#79

Yeah, nothing disrespectful at all by taking a knee. A very humble posture anyway, and not as though they were turning their backs to the flag.


#80

I really don’t care one way or the other about the messaging of taking a need. I do, however, think that doing things like that add a funky dynamic to the idea of being a team. I largely loathe professional sports so I am not sure there ever was much of a sense of fellowship there to begin with, but I at least try to give them some benefit of the doubt on that part. For that reason, I think they should at least stand with their team and express whatever it is they intend to express by choosing whether or not to put their hands over their heart during the anthem.