Illegal Immigration Costs California $30.3 Billion A Year—17.7% Of State Budget


#1

In light of Donald Trump’s crackdown on illegal immigrants, it’s worth looking at the facts—how many illegal immigrants are there, and what do they cost America?

Lots. Almost $150 billion a year.

But this article focuses specifically on California, which is home to an estimated 27% of America’s illegal aliens.

You can read the full report on illegal immigrants in America here; I cover economics, crime, culture, and morality.

Illegal Immigrants Cost California $30.29 Billion A Year

Illegal immigrants and their children cost California at least $30.29 billion a year in net costs—$7,352 per alien.

For context: given that California’s state budget is $171 billion, this means that illegal immigration would cost 17.7% of this spending (although much of the costs are absorbed locally).

At this point, the question is no longer whether California ought to allow illegal immigration—it’s whether it can afford it.

Illegal aliens are expensive, and financial burden on California’s already strained government is unsustainable. Worse, it’s already taking its toll.

Just this week California’s Oroville Dam was on the brink of breaching, due to financial neglect—there’s just not enough money to go around.

oroville dam main spillway overflow
Oroville dam’s main & auxiliary spillways were opened to relieve water pressure. The state was aware of the need for upgrades 12 years ago.
Immanent disaster seems to have alerted the state legislature of the need for action—last week they requested $100 billion in federal funding to rebuild their state.

Frankly I hope they get the funding. They need it.

But it brings up an important question: why can’t they afford to maintain their state themselves?

California is America’s largest and richest state. It’s the home of giant, high-tech, highly profitable companies like Apple and Google—yet it’s fallen into disrepair.

Frankly, it’s because the state’s been flooded with illegal immigrants, who increase systemic strain without proportionally contributing to the economy.

Basically, Californians are supporting themselves, in addition to a very large underclass—one in eleven Californians are illegal immigrants (at bare minimum).

This is much like Sweden, which now spends over 20% of it’s tax dollars on migrants. It’s not that bad in California, but it’s very close.

How Many Illegal Immigrants Are In The US? California?

In all honesty, no one really knows.

They’re undocumented. That’s the whole point.

Estimates are wide-ranging. On the low end, Pew Research estimates that the number of illegal immigrants in the US is roughly 11.1 million—this number tracks fairly closely with official government figures.

On the high end, estimates peg the number of illegal aliens in the US at roughly 30 million people. This number has been proposed by conservative author Ann Coulter in her book Adios America. She based the figure off banking and remittance payment records, government service demand, and migration projections from ICE.

Frankly, I think the math makes much more sense with Coulter’s estimate, but in the interests of neutrality, this article will proceed using the lowest realistic number of illegal immigrants in California (11.1 million).

But that’s for the entire USA. What about California?

According to the Migration Policy Institute, there are 3,019,000 adult illegal immigrants living in the state of California. On top of this are 1.1 million children of illegal immigrants (975,000 of which would be considered anchor babies).

Hispanic Americans protest illegal immigration
Americans of all backgrounds are impacted by illegal immigration, which suppresses wages for American citizens, and increases the cost of living.
In total, there are 4.12 million illegal immigrants, and their children living in California.

Furthermore, these people use government services (which proponents of illegal immigration often try to minimize). I’ll get into the details later, but just as an example, some 806,000 undocumented migrants had drivers licences in 2016.

Most are also relatively unskilled with poor language skills. It is estimated that 54% of illegals speak English “not well” or speak it “not at all”. This is why they tend to work in low level service sector jobs, like in restaurants, or doing manual labor, like picking fruit.

In any event, it must be noted that illegal immigrants aren’t adding value to the economy that teenagers or machines couldn’t easily do, given the chance.

So that’s the number we’re dealing with. Let’s look at the cost of illegal immigration, the facts and statistics, and see how they break down.

Calculating The Cost Of Illegal Immigration In California

california classrooms are crowded
California’s classrooms are some of the most crowded in the country—classes are swollen by a large number of “anchor babies” and undocumented children.
Education For Illegal Immigrants: $15.63 Billion

As stated, there are 975,000 anchor babies and 130,000 undocumented children living in California. This totals 1.105 million children—all of whom are educated largely at state expense.

Although the California Department of Education doesn’t include undocumented children as a separate statistical group in terms of costs, we know that the total enrollment in California’s public schools was 6,226,737 in 2016. A further 573,000 attended private charter schools.

Given that the vast majority of illegal immigrants attend public schools, this means that roughly 17.7% of California’s public student population is comprised of children here illegally, or the children of illegal immigrants.

This inflated student population costs a lot, and adds huge burdens on California’s education system.

According to California’s state budget, $88.3 billion is allocated for California’s K-12 students ($51.6 billion from California, the rest from local and federal initiatives).

Given their proportion of the student population, illegal immigrants and their children eat up $15.63 billion in educational costs.

This lowers the quality of education for American citizens, especially since California’s student-to-teacher ratio is 35% above the national average.

This is directly the result of illegal immigration—it’s the kids that suffer.

Healthcare For Illegal Immigrants: $4.02 Billion

Providing healthcare for illegal immigrants in California imposes significant costs, while also increasing wait-times and decreasing the overall quality of care (by lowering the physician-to-patient ratio).

Illegal immigrants withdraw roughly $2.28 billion from Medicaid in California, and cost roughly $1.3 billion in emergency services (they are treated, but do not pay).

Together, these hard costs equate to $4.02 billion per year.

However, these numbers don’t necessarily reflect the true costs of illegal aliens on the healthcare system, because they don’t quantify opportunity costs (we could be investing in better technology, or more doctors, rather than treating illegal immigrants) or damage caused by the burdened system (pain and suffering caused by long wait times, lost productivity etc.).

Remittance Payments: $3.86 Billion

A remittance is a transfer of money from someone in the US to their family back home.

They are usually given by recent immigrants, and particularly by illegal immigrants and visa card holders (who come to America to work in order to support their family abroad).

Basically, a remittance is money lost from the economy: it vanishes, never to be spent domestically.

According to Pew Research America lost $133.6 billion in remittances in 2015.

Of this, $24 billion went to Mexico (the biggest recipient).

Other important destinations, for our purposes, are Guatemala ($5.9 billion), El Salvador ($3.98 billion), the Dominican Republic ($3.83 billion), and Honduras ($3.2 billion).

All totaled, $40.9 billion was sent from the US to Mexico and Central America.

Now, we can’t assume that only illegal immigrants send remittances, so I will estimate that first generation immigrants and illegal immigrants send remittances at the same frequency.

This will provide us with an (intentionally) low estimate for remittances paid by illegal immigrants to Mexico and Central America alone.

Given that there are 11.7 million legal immigrants from Mexico, and 3.1 million from Central America living in the USA, this gives as a pool of 14.8 million legal immigrants contributing to the remittance figures.

We also know that 74% of illegal immigrants are from Mexico or Central America, or 8.14 million.

This means that of the total Hispanic population assuming to be paying remittances, 35% are likely illegal immigrants. This works out to illegals paying out $14.31 billion to the region annually.

If we narrow this down to California, where 27% of total illegal immigrants live, then we can determine that Californian illegal immigrants remit $3.86 billion every year to Mexico and Central America.

This is to say nothing of the other nearly 1 million illegal immigrants, most of whom overstayed their visas, which would add significantly to this figure.

Crimes Committed By Illegal Immigrants: $4.4 Billion

40% of all federal crimes occur in states bordering Mexico.
The additional costs imposed by crimes committed by illegal immigrants, which include policing, court, and incarceration costs, add up to $4.4 billion, according to the study done by the Federation for American Immigration Reform.

This includes an additional $1.85 billion for policing, $1.12 billion for court services, and $1.54 billion for prisons.

As significant as this is, it doesn’t begin to approach the true costs of crime, which should rightly factor in lost productivity and wages, and intangible costs such as pain and suffering, long-term social costs (such as a reduction in community cohesion etc.). The list goes on and on.

These intangible costs (which are never included in such studies because of their vagueness) are likely significantly higher than the tangible costs.

For example, a study which estimated the average intangible costs of crimes in California (2008 dollars) shows that the real cost is much higher than the calculated costs for most crimes—especially for violent and sexual crimes.

The intangible costs are estimated based on special damages awarded by court proceedings.

Type of Offense Tangible Cost Intangible Cost Total Cost
Murder $1,285,146 $8,442,000 $8,982,907
Rape/Sexual Assault $41,252 $199,642 $240,776
Aggravated Assault $19,472 $95,023 $107,020
Robbery $21,373 $22,575 $42,310
Arson $16,429 $5,133 $21,103
Motor Vehicle Theft $10,534 $262 $10,772
Stolen Property $7,974 N/A $7,974
Household Burglary $6,169 $321 $6,462
Embezzlement $5,480 N/A $5,480
Forgery and Counterfeiting $5,265 N/A $5,265
Fraud $5,032 N/A $5,032
Vandalism $4,860 N/A $4,860
Larceny/Theft $3,523 $10 $3,532
Were we to include intangible costs, even doubling the stated figure of $4.4 billion would probably understate the situation.

Frankly, I think the number’s probably higher in terms of tangible costs, given that the proportional percent of crimes committed by illegal immigrants is high. For example, almost 75% federal drug possession sentences were given to illegal immigrants, and 40% of all federal crimes were committed in jurisdictions neighboring the Mexican border—meaning they were likely due to gang and drug trafficking committed by illegal immigrants.

Simply put, the statistics show that illegal immigrants dramatically increase crime rates.

Beyond that, illegal immigrants are highly over-represented in murder charges, committing 38% of all murders in California, Texas, Arizona, Florida and New York.

We’ll stick with $4.4 billion as our ballpark, but it’s probably at least double that.

Government Administration & Services: $1.6 Billion

Added strain caused by the illegal immigrant population costs California $1.6 billion a year.

Included in this number are things like the upkeep of parks, public recreation areas, libraries, roads, fire departments, and $792 million in state welfare handouts.

This number doesn’t include intangible costs of systemic strain, such as longer lines, busier parks etc. This contributes to the quality of life, but can’t easily be measured.

It also doesn’t include the spillover impact on American citizens who need public assistance but can’t get it, because illegal immigrants are milking the system.

For example, roughly 1.5 million citizens spend over half their income on shelter in California—housing is expensive because illegal immigrants compete in the property market, inflating costs. You never hear about this, but the cost of living is increased due to illegal immigration.

Tax Revenue: $3.5 Billion

Illegal immigrants do pay taxes, including sales taxes and (sometimes) payroll taxes. It’s estimated that they contribute $3.5 billion in taxes to California’s state revenue.

This isn’t even close to what they withdraw in terms of services.

Annual Cost Of Illegal Immigration To California: $30.29 Billion

Illegal aliens cost California $30.29 billion every single year—this includes their contribution in terms of taxes.

This works out to $7,352 per illegal immigrant.

This massive burden is one of the main reasons California’s schools and infrastructure is in a total state of disrepair.

These estimates are likely very low, since they don’t include any intangible costs associated with crime or increased systemic strain, they low-ball remittance estimates, and the number of illegal aliens in California is realistically at least double the numbers used.

How Do We Fix The Problems With Illegal Immigration?

Frankly, the only way to do it is to deport the illegal immigrants, starting with the criminals.

This is not a moral question, it’s a question of fact—California can’t continue to support a massive population of undocumented migrants on the public expense.

The costs are too great, and it’s seriously impacting the quality of life of America’s own people—particularly black and Hispanic American citizens, who often directly compete with illegal immigrants for jobs.

Deportation may sound bad, but it needs to happen. And if we’re being honest, most would probably self-deport if California were to stop subsidizing their living expenses, and the government cracked down on employers who hire illegals.

No jobs, no welfare: no reason to stay.

The second element is to make sure we keep them out. America needs to invest more in border security, and this includes a wall.

And to those who think walls don’t work, you’re sorely mistaken. Walls worked in Israel. Walls worked in Hungary. And walls will work here.

There’s a reason the East Germans built the Berlin wall: it worked.


#2

The Cost Of Illegal Immigration In Texas

Illegal immigrants aren’t cheap. In fact, they cost America nearly $150 billion a year, just in terms of tax dollars and remittances.

But of course the illegal population isn’t dispersed evenly throughout the country: places like California have lots, while others, like Montana, have very few.

For example: in California, 1 in 6 school age children are illegal immigrants or anchor babies—no wonder aliens cost California some $30.29 billion a year.

But this raises another question; how much are other States paying?

In this article I look specifically at the cost of illegal immigration in Texas, which is home to an estimated 13% of America’s illegal aliens.

illegal immigrant gets free education
Mayte Lara may get good grades, but a real genius would not brag about being in the country illegally.
Illegal Immigrants Cost Texas $12.36 Billion A Year

Illegal immigrants, and their children, cost Texans a net $12.36 billion a year. That works out to roughly $6,000 per alien.

Of this, $10.03 billion came out of taxpayer pockets.

Given that Texas’s biennial budget for 2016-2017 was 209.4 billion this means that illegal immigrants eat up 9.6% of their budget ended up being spent spent on illegal immigrants.

Let’s look at it another way: for every $9 Texas spends on its citizens, it spends $1 on illegal aliens.

That’s just not right.

Texas has one of the most diverse and robust economies in the United States. They have a booming manufacturing sector and are contributing to the recent push towards energy independence for the entire country.

The additional burden of illegal immigrants on the welfare system (which granted, isn’t as lavish as California’s) eats up funds that could otherwise be invested in the economy (either directly, through maintaining high-quality infrastructure, or indirectly via lower taxes).

Either way, this would benefit Texas, and the US as a whole—it would trim the fat, so to speak.

What it boils down to is this: illegal immigrants take much more from the economy than they give back.

Let’s look at the numbers.

How Many Illegal Immigrants Are In America?

Fundamentally, we don’t know—they’re undocumented, they live off off the grid, and they’re hard to track.

Because of this, even the best of estimates can be vastly different.

Pew Research pegs the number of illegal immigrants in the US as roughly 11.1 million (the government says something similar).

This is at the low end, the bare minimum.

On the higher (more realistic) end, it’s estimated that there are 30 million aliens living in the US.

Ann Coulter argues that this number is more accurate. In her book Adios America she looked at non-conventional evidence such as remittance payment records, bank records, and migration projections from ICE, as well as more conventional tools like the burden on government services.

She reasoned that while the government has a vested political interest in ensuring the number of illegal immigrants remains low (the same logic applies to other metrics, like the unemployment), banks have a vested interest in keeping accurate accounting data—if they want to collect their money, they need to know who’s sending it.

I agree with Coulter, especially given the fact that the government estimates of the illegal population haven’t changed in a decade (and it’s not like people magically stopped overstaying their visas in the meantime)—think of it like this: the numbers haven’t changed much since 2005, and yet we know that there were roughly 1 million crossings on the southern border every year (not to mention the visa overstays, again).

Also, half a million people are apprehended at the border every year—they’re still trying (and probably succeeding) to get into America.

The stagnant number doesn’t make sense.

Nevertheless, in the interests of presenting a balanced argument, I’ll use the lowest possible estimate: 11.1 million. I think even with such a low number, the case against illegal immigration is closed—everything else is just icing on the cake.

OK, what about Texas?

There Are 2.06 Million Illegal Immigrants In Texas (Including Anchor Babies)

According to the Migration Policy Institute, there are 1,470,000 adult illegal immigrants living in Texas.

This number is echoed by the Houston Chronicle (1.5 million) and Pew Research (1.7 million)—of course, they’re all working with the same source data, so it’s not really a surprise they match.

In addition, there are 588,000 children of illegal immigrants (509,000 of them would be considered anchor babies).

Summed up, there are 2.06 million illegal immigrants and their children living in Texas.

Facts About Illegal Immigrants In Texas

Let’s paint a better picture using current data from the MPI.

91% of illegal immigrants in Texas are from Latin America: 78% from Mexico, 4% from El Salvador, 4% from Honduras, and 3% from Guatemala, 2% other.
83% of Texas’ illegal aliens arrived in the last 20 years; 39% in the last 10.
60% of illegals have not completed high school education or a GED.
57% of aliens either speak English poorly, or not at all.
89% speak Spanish at home.
Overall, it is fair to say that the majority of Texas’ illegal immigrants are relatively uneducated, and therefore compete with US workers at the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum.

What Is The Cost Of Illegal Immigration In Texas?

Education For Illegal Immigrants Costs $7.87 Billion

Anchor babies and undocumented children make education more expensive by crowding classrooms. This, in turn, reduces the quality of said education, because bigger classrooms mean more interruptions and less one-on-one time with the teacher.

Overall, illegals make public school worse and increase its costs.

As I said earlier, there are 509,000 anchor babies and 79,000 undocumented children living in Texas, which totals 588,000 children. And since they’re not going to private schools (go figure), that means you’re paying for them.

And for those who think they shouldn’t be educated, the sad thing is that if they weren’t in schools, we’d be stuck in a bizarre Oliver Twist meets el Chapo type situation—it’s better to have them in school than on the streets (of course, it’s better to have them back in Central America than in Texas).

Given that Texas’ total public school enrollment was 5,299,728 in 2016 (247,389 were enrolled in private charter schools), this means that 11.1% of students in Texas’ public schools are children of illegal immigrants of illegal immigrants themselves.

This may not seem like a big proportion, but remember, it should be 0%.

According to Texas’s state budget, $61 billion is spent on K-12 public schools. This number does not take into account spending on student courts or education services centers.

Given that 11.1% of student are illegals, this means illegals soak up $6.77 billion in educational costs.

Additionally, many of these children don’t speak English well and need supplemental English instruction?

The Federation for American Immigration Reform estimated that for 2014, ESL lessons cost Texan taxpayers $1.1 billion.

Ignoring the inevitable increases in costs from year to year, this means educating illegal immigrants and anchor babies costs Texas at least $7.87 billion a year.

Of course, this leaves out post-secondary education grants, pre-K education, and other financial assistance given to undocumented students and children of illegal immigrants.

Healthcare For Illegal Immigrants: $1.86 Billion

Texas inevitably provides healthcare for illegal immigrants, which significantly affects the quality of care for citizens by increasing wait times and lowering the physician-to-patient ratio.

Illegal immigrants withdraw roughly $1.03 billion in Medicaid and other public healthcare services (CHIP, CSHCN). They also result in $830 million of uncompensated emergency services.

This totals $1.86 billion per year.

However, these costs don’t necessarily accurately estimate the impact of illegals on the healthcare system, since it doesn’t quantify the opportunity costs (if we invested the money in better technology, or additional doctors, rather than treating illegal immigrants) or damage caused by the burdened system (suffering caused by long waiting times in crowded hospitals etc.)

Remittance Payments Cost Texas $2.33 Billion A Year

For a more detailed explanation of remittances see this article on illegal immigration.

Basically, a remittance is when someone sends money they made in one country (America) to another (Mexico).

America loses billions of dollars in remittances every year.

This is a rough calculation, but it will give you an idea of how much illegal immigrants draw from the economy:

According to Pew Research America lost $133.6 billion in remittances in 2015: most of which were sent by either first generation immigrants or illegals (assume per capita remittances between both groups is equal).

Of this $40.9 billion was sent from the US to Mexico and Central America, presumably by people from that region.

Given that there are 11.7 million legal immigrants from Mexico, and 3.1 million from Central America living in the USA, this gives as a pool of 14.8 million legal immigrants contributing to the remittance figures.

Additionally, because 74% of illegal immigrants are from Mexico or Central America, there are likewise 8.14 million illegals contributing.

Therefore, of the total Hispanic population assumed to be paying remittances, 35% are likely illegal immigrants. This works out to illegals paying out $14.31 billion to the region annually.

If we narrow this down to Texas, where 16.25% of total Hispanic illegal immigrants live (90% of Texas’s illegal immigrants are Hispanic), then we can determine that illegal immigrants cost Texas $2.33 billion every year.

Crimes Committed By Illegal Immigrants: $1.01 Billion

The additional costs imposed by crimes committed by illegal immigrants, which include policing, court, and incarceration costs, add up to $1.01 billion, according to the study done by the Federation for American Immigration Reform.

This includes an additional $455 million for policing, $180 million for court services, and $445 million for prisons.

As significant as this is, it doesn’t begin to approach the true costs of crime, which should rightly factor in lost productivity and intangible costs such as pain and suffering, and long-term social costs (such as a reduction in community cohesion and quality of life etc.).

These intangible costs (which are never included in such studies because of their vagueness) are likely significantly higher than the tangible costs.

For example, a study which estimated the average intangible costs of crimes (2008 dollars) shows that the real cost is much higher than the calculated costs for most crimes—especially for violent and sexual crimes.

The intangible costs are estimated based on special damages awarded by court proceedings.

Type of Offense Tangible Cost Intangible Cost Total Cost
Murder $1,285,146 $8,442,000 $8,982,907
Rape/Sexual Assault $41,252 $199,642 $240,776
Aggravated Assault $19,472 $95,023 $107,020
Robbery $21,373 $22,575 $42,310
Arson $16,429 $5,133 $21,103
Motor Vehicle Theft $10,534 $262 $10,772
Stolen Property $7,974 N/A $7,974
Household Burglary $6,169 $321 $6,462
Embezzlement $5,480 N/A $5,480
Forgery and Counterfeiting $5,265 N/A $5,265
Fraud $5,032 N/A $5,032
Vandalism $4,860 N/A $4,860
Larceny/Theft $3,523 $10 $3,532
Were we to include intangible costs, even doubling the stated figure of $1.01 billion would probably understate the situation—it’s probably double or higher.

Government Administration & Services: $577 Million

Additional government administration and services costs in Texas due to illegal immigration are $577 million a year (again, according to FAIR).

This refers to things such as upkeep of parks, public recreation areas, libraries, roads, and fire departments.

This number doesn’t include intangible costs of systemic strain or adverse impacts on citizens’ qualities of life.

It also doesn’t include the effect on American citizens who need public services but can’t get them because illegal immigrants are flooding the system.

Tax Revenue: $1.27 Billion

Illegal immigrants actually do pay taxes, including consumption taxes (sales tax), property taxes, and payroll taxes. It’s estimated that they pay $1.27 billion in taxes in Texas.

This is significantly lower than what they draw from public services.

Annual Cost Of Illegal Immigration To Texas: $12.36 Billion

This number might seem low. This was done purposefully to show that even if we take the lowest estimates that are relied upon for illegal immigrant proponents, they still show the illegal immigrants take a a ridiculous amount more than they give.

It’s not even close.

But let’s just consider some other cost qualifiers that, if calculated (or even calculable), would provide an even more dire picture for illegal immigration.

Additional Considerations

To start, as I said at the outset, the number of illegals is likely very far from the truth.

If we used the illegal immigrant estimate from Adios America of 30-50 million illegal immigrants (likely much closer to the truth), and assume similar proportions, we would be somewhere in the ballpark of around $35 billion to 60 billion a year; just for Texas!

To put that in perspective that costs more than the entire wall across the southern border.

Using different estimates for the education section the true cost burden of illegal immigrants could be anywhere from $6.9 billion to $8.5 billion.

Regarding education, these costs don’t take into account the cost of reduced quality of education because of overcrowded classrooms and other burdens. Further, it doesn’t take into account the language barrier in learning as well as the impact it has on the other English-fluent children in the classroom.

For healthcare, additional wait times can literally be life or death situations. Having an increased load on doctors and emergency workers can cost often unforeseen additional amounts. For example, if someone with who’s illness worsens in the time it takes to see a doctor.

Reduced quality of services (including healthcare, education, justice, and governmental administration services) all have snowballing effects too. For example, that same person’s illness has now worsened and now needs to take even more total time in the healthcare system over the course of their life, thus pushing more patients to wait longer.

These things compound.

Here’s another example; one student in the classroom needs extra time with the teacher, but he can’t get help because an undocumented child also needs that time from the teacher. This student now does not understand the concept as well as they move forward with the class—he now has a harder time learning subsequent lessons, and ends up permanently behind.

This happens all the time.

Now these children that have come out of the public education system have to spend time catching up (as a whole). Perhaps they take longer to get into college, or have lower confidence etc.

You get the point.

Also, none of these estimates take in the intangible costs such as: pain and suffering, lost opportunity costs, technology investment, automation investment, potential black swan events, reduced social cohesion, lost productivity due to language barriers, political costs, higher crime rates and whatever else you can think of.

How Do We Fix It?

Three things need to be done: build the wall, deport the illegals, stop incentivizing illegal immigration.

Hopefully by now, just by looking at Texas’s cost of illegal immigration, you can see that the wall would be a good investment—especially since most of Texas’ illegals simply walked in.

But it’s not just the wall. We need to start deporting illegal immigrants at a much faster rate than they are coming in. We should start with the criminals (even though they’re all technically criminals).

This has to be done in tandem with building the wall. There’s no point to deporting illegals who will just come back in. It’s like bailing water out of a boat with holes in it; futile.

Lastly, we must stop providing welfare benefits to illegal aliens. Don’t provide them healthcare, or education, or any of it. It may sound harsh, but taxpayers in America pay for Americans to have education, not Chileans, not Saudi Arabians, and not Mexicans—whether they’re on our soil or not.

If we stopped the welfare benefits I wouldn’t be surprised if many illegals self-deported. Many of them come to mooch off the system—don’t let them and they will leave.

Texas, much like California, cannot afford the costs of illegal immigration forever.


#3

Those liberal fools have plenty of cash for taxes ! :laughing: Tax them at 90% :laughing:


#4

7 Ways To Stop Illegal Immigration
August 23, 2017 Spencer P Morrison Analysis 2
illegal immigrant Texas
The 7 Best Ways to Solve the Problem of Illegal Immigration

President Trump promised he would stop illegal immigration. So far, he’s done a good job: border crossings are down (way down), and deportations are up (way up). ICE now has teeth and is doing its job.

This is all good news.

But at this point there’s not a whole lot more Trump can do without Congress’ cooperation—it’s up to the GOP to pass substantive legislation and allocate funding for the bigger projects (like the border wall).

This is bad news.

Congress is incompetent, corrupt, and lazy. If there’s no fire under their ass, nothing will get done—and even if they somehow find the energy, they’ll probably do a bad job. Just think of how royally they botched Obamacare (it didn’t have to be that bad).

That’s why we, the people, need to do the thinking for them. Here’s how we solve the problem of illegal immigration.

But first, for those who are still on the fence regarding this issue, I’ve provided a brief rundown as to why illegal immigration is bad for America.

Why Do We Need to Stop Illegal Immigration?

Illegal immigration is a big problem for America—politically, social, and economically. We need to fix it.

The political effects are damning enough to warrant finding a solution to illegal immigration. Why? Because the fight over what to do with illegal aliens is divisive. It’s a wedge issue. This is bad for America’s democracy.

And of course, there’s the perennial issue of illegal voting.

Illegal immigration causes social problems as well: polls show that more-and-more Americans are starting to feel like “strangers in their own land.” Illegal aliens are changing our neighborhoods and cities, our entire culture, dramatically—and we don’t even get a vote. It’s just happening.

Crime is also a persistent social issue. Facts are facts: illegal immigrants are responsible for an appalling numbers of crimes against American citizens every year, many of which are drug crimes. In fact, some 75% of all federal drug possession charges were laid on illegal aliens.

Finally, illegal immigration is hurting the economy. It’s making us poor.

Not only do illegals eat up hundreds of billions in tax dollars every year, but they hurt American workers by undercutting their wages. The below graphic illustrates some of the biggest costs.

cost of illegal immigration in america infographic
Of course, there are many other reasons why we need to stop illegal immigration into America, but this gives you some context.

Now let’s get into the good stuff: how do we solve the problem of illegal immigration?

  1. Stop Hiring Illegal Aliens—Punish Employers

Economics isn’t really about money, it’s about choice: why do people buy what they buy and do what they do? Specifically, what motivates them? What are the incentives disincentives that frame said choices?

If we look at the problem of illegal immigration from an economic standpoint, and explore the underlying choice-architecture, it becomes clear that our own domestic policies are mostly to blame—illegal immigrants are behaving entirely rationally given the incentives we’ve created.

Basically, aliens want jobs, Americans hire them. It’s that simple.

For example, it’s estimated that roughly half of all construction workers in Texas are illegal aliens. More broadly, some 9% of all workers in America’s hospitality industry are aliens, and up to 16% of agricultural workers, according to Pew Research. And this is just the low-end jobs.

Remember, some 40% of all illegal aliens are actually visa-overstays, many of whom are employed in Silicon Valley, slaving away for Google and Microsoft.

The prospect of employment creates a powerful incentive for people from relatively poor countries, like the Philippines or India, to come to America and work—even though the jobs are often bottom-end here, they’re far better than conditions back home.

And like I said, many work for relatively large corporations—from big hotel chains, to grocery stores, to technology companies. There’s a “don’t ask, don’t tell” when it comes to someone’s immigration status.

So how do we fix it? We need to remove the incentive to come to America in the first place. That is, we need to crack down on the employers—hire an illegal and risk a large fine, jail time, dissolution of your corporation etc. Whichever makes most sense depending upon the situation.

Until we remove the work-incentive, illegal immigration is going to continue, no matter how strictly we patrol the border.

  1. Cut Off Welfare: Don’t Let Illegal Immigrants Collect State Benefits

Work is one major lure, welfare is another—the more generous, the bigger the lure.illegal immigrant student getting free education
Right now, illegal aliens are able to claim a host of government benefits ranging from subsidized housing, to emergency medical care, to public education.

For example, California spends over $17 billion annually to educate illegal immigrants and their children. Likewise, the state spends over $4 billion a year providing them with healthcare.

You have to remember, many illegal immigrants are arriving from relatively poor countries with undeveloped social infrastructure—having your children educated in American schools is a good deal for most people in places like Nicaragua. From their perspective, illegally immigrating is a rational choice.

If we cracked down on employment prospects, in addition to welfare abuse, then there would be little incentive left for most illegal aliens to remain in America. I have a feeling that, faced with this situation, most would self-deport.

  1. Build The Wall, Make Mexico Pay for It

Even if we cracked down on employers and reduced the availability of welfare, there would still be many who slip through the cracks—and yet others would still want to enter America for criminal purposes.

This is why we need a wall.

Not only would the wall be an effective deterrent, and a powerful symbol, it would be permanent—the next administration could reduce funding for ICE, but it is very unlikely that they would destroy the wall.

The best part? The wall would be cheap, and it would work.

And don’t give me some tripe about it being difficult to build: “there are rivers and mountains in the way!” That didn’t stop the Chinese from building their Great Wall by hand, and it wouldn’t stop us from building it with the marvels of modern technology.

And the icing on the cake? Getting Mexico to pay for it.

  1. 40% of Illegal Immigrants are Visa-Overstays: We Need to Track Them

The wall is important, but perhaps more important is the cyber-wall: a way to track people entering the country through legal channels to make sure they actually leave when their visa is expired.

Like I said, some 40% of all illegal aliens are in America because they overstayed their visa.

President Trump has taken action to fix this: beginning next year the Department of Homeland Security will roll out visa-overstay tracking software to deal with this problem.

  1. Crack Down on Sanctuary Cities: Enforce the Law

President Trump is already doing this, so no problems here. From one of my previous articles:

Under President Trump, ICE was instructed to increase its cooperation with local law enforcement so that it could better find illegal aliens who have committed crimes. They did that, and they did a good job. In fact, ICE now has official cooperation agreements with 59 law enforcement agencies (known as ‘287(g) agreements‘) in 18 states.

In addition to this, ICE is in the process of partnering up with many more jurisdictions.

The wrench in the machine are so-called ‘sanctuary cities‘, which are municipalities (or other local jurisdictions) that refuse to cooperate with ICE agents. Basically, they protect criminal illegal aliens from deportation. Why? Who knows. One would assume that any rational person would want criminals who are in the country illegally deported, rather than being released back into the community.

But, in defiance of all logic and reason, sanctuary cities exist.

To deal with these rebellious enclaves, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that federal funding for sanctuary cities will be cut if they refuse to comply with federal immigration law. Specifically, sanctuary cities could be denied their Edward Bryne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants, or JAG grants.

Beyond funding, Sessions is also threatening to charge recalcitrant mayors and city officials with human smuggling.

  1. Make ICE Great Again: Hire More Border Guards

President Trump has made good headway on this point.

For example, he has given the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration Enforcement (ICE) agents a new mandate: find and deport illegal immigrants, particularly those who pose a risk to American citizens (criminals).

Basically, President Trump gave ICE teeth, and a longer leash.

ICE is getting results: arrests for immigration-related offences are up by nearly 40 percent. Furthermore, ICE has increased its issuance of detainers by 75% (when they request local law enforcement to hold individuals in their custody so ICE can get them), and increased the number of people it places in removal proceedings by 47%.

Oh, and illegal border crossings are down by 70%—we can’t forget to mention that. Why? Because people are scared of being deported. This is just commons sense.

  1. Pay them to leave

This last point may sound counter-intuitive, but it is worth trying as a last resort (and only as a last resort): we could pay illegals to self-deport—pay them once, if they try to double-dip, then we met out harsh punishments.

Remember, deporting someone is quite expensive. It is much more cost-effective for people to simply remove themselves. By paying someone, say $5,000 or $10,000 to leave America, we could save a ton (relative to getting ICE involved).

This may not sound like much, but it is a decent sum to someone from a Third World country.

The benefits of this would be that it would be cheap and humane—but it’s not without downsides. Paying people to leave could create a new incentive to play red rover with the border patrol. Furthermore, it would burn valuable political capital.

But if nothing else works, we could give it a try—like I said, this is a last resort option.

That’s How We Solve the Problem of Illegal Immigration

Solving the problem of illegal immigration really boils down to common sense: no jobs, no welfare, no illegal immigrants.

And for the drug traffickers and other criminals, we have ICE. We have a wall.

If we really want to stop illegal immigration we need a multi-faceted approach that embraces both the iron fist and the velvet glove.

I think President Trump’s on the right path, but he’s done about as much as he can. It’s up to Congress to finish the job—hopefully they follow through.


#5


#6

verses the cost of a WALL !


#7

I often wonder why there is so much pushback from the left on sealing our border. Everyone should know that anyone can cross the southern border pretty much unimpeded. What will it take, a major disaster caused by a terrorist group the has entered th US via the southern border before thy pull their heads out?

More likely the left would blame the border patrol for not catching them.


#8

I think you miss the entire thought process of the left… it can be summarized in this little rhyme recently used at one of their marches for peace and luvvvv…

No Trump, No Wall, No USA At All


#9

Anyone can cross into the US.


#10

The left knows this is their future base , the democratic bench .