President Donald J. Trump Backs RAISE Act


#21

Net positive for the economy yes, at the benefit of the working class and middle class.

The studies that show that immigration helps the economy also show that it generates more jobs…for the elites.

Because you know, those big multinationals can hire them for low wages and create more wealth for the elites. More labor, less cost, more output.

Immigrants may be the scapegoat in your opinion but they’re definitely being used to strengthen income inequality - which has all but eliminated the middle class.


#22

In my opinion here is the main problem, multinational corporations / the upper class control most of the wealth in the world and in order to implement a UBI, some of that wealth will probably be taken to benefit the common good.

That’s also the solution to this problem, be harsher on the multinational corporations, tax them more, introduce more regulations, and then, hopefully, some of the wealth would be more equally distributed. The problem isn’t the immigrants, who are pretty much already poor af, but the immigrants and our common enemy, the people at the top who control much of the capital and political capital.


#23

No the problem is that the immigrants who are already poor af are moving into the country and taking chances from other poor people to stop them from having a chance at not being poor af.

It’s plain logic that adding more people into the market creates competition and if left unchecked eventually creates saturation.


#24

Yeah but you’re still gonna be poor unless redistribution happens, I don’t see how deporting/blocking all the immigrants would do any benefit to the “native” working class if we don’t actually go after corporations.

Wealth inequality is increasing not because of immigrants but the extensive power and influence that the liberal elites have in politics and in monetary terms.


#25

@canvas you are absolutely right. More competition for native workers means less opportunities for them.


#26

Look, the thing about globalization is that companies have all the authority on deciding who labors for what. An example includes companies directing all their technical support to india. Those jobs are pretty much gone. Expelling immigrants won’t help to get them back. Same goes for manufacturing jobs and coal miners, automation and the more efficient natural gas took the jobs. Again, not the immigrant’s fault. Also what one needs to realize is that many immigrants work in very specialized fields, many of them different from the ones that native-born people work in. In reality, only modest wage changes change happen from immigration…

https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/app.1.3.135

…rather than immigrants taking a huge portion of jobs and livelihood. It can be argued in fact that immigrants create jobs, whether it be companies (google a good example, having the search engine google is a generally good thing), restaurants etc. Immigrants often put in more money than they take out of the american system by paying taxes and creating businesses. Illegal Immigrants and legal immigrants are also much less likely to be incarcerated than regular americans.


#27

Personally I think your wrong.

30% of the American population today is foreign born. With that many foreign born many without an education or marketable job skills, it’s time to become more selective.

After all we want more entry level labor it’s walking across the border everyday.


#28

How many entry level low wage workers are enough?

With an excess of entry level workers wage stagnation occurs and then the government steps in and artificially raises wages via minimum wage increase.

And exactly how is that good for the country when many of the minimum wage workers ar sending that wage increase to their home countries???


#29

Immigrants are 22 percent of federal prison population
A stunning 22 percent of inmates in the federal prison population are immigrants who have either already been deemed to be in the country illegally or who the government is looking to put in deportation proceedings, the administration said Tuesday.

President Trump requested the numbers as part of his initial immigration executive orders.

The 22 percent is much higher than the population of foreign-born in the U.S. as a whole, which is about 13.5 percent.

All told, the government counted more than 42,000 aliens in federal prisons as of June 24.

About 47 percent already face final deportation orders, making them illegal immigrants, and 3 percent are currently in immigration courts facing deportation proceedings.

Almost all of the rest are being probed by federal agents looking to deport them.

Immigrants who commit serious crimes, even if they once had legal status, can have that status revoked and can be subject to deportation, which explains the high number of cases where an alien is still being probed by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The U.S. Marshal Service, meanwhile, is holding about 12,000 “self-reporting” aliens, and almost all of them have already been ordered deported.

Government officials said they’re still working to try to collect information on the foreign-born population in state and local prisons and jails.


#30

@LouMan I don’t know what to say to all of that, other than one isn’t guaranteed to a job, native-born or immigrant in our current economic system. Believe it or not, immigrants are pretty much the same as others, self interested individuals who just want the best out of life. The reason why living conditions are not improving drastically isn’t because of immigration, its because of the massive wealth inequality that exists in our world currently, partly due to neocons such as Thatcher and Reagan, both proponents of trickle down economics, who knew how to get numbers up, but not the actual livelihoods of people. The already wealthy obtain most of the new wealth, while the rest of us get poorer and poorer by the day, immigrant or native-born.


#31

You think??

Supply and demand dictates that wages be a strain amount. What employer in their right mind would pay more for entry level labor than the market demands? Unless the government demands they p[ay more.

Think about it, if 1 million illegals went home tomorrow it would create a labor shortage and wages would match the demand of the labor shortage.

But it’s always fashionable to blame someone else like the wealthy for what government created.


#32

Is that to say that the wealthy do not exert an excessive amount of control over our government? I’m sure the wealthy weren’t interested at all in receiving corporate bailouts for shitty performance and I bet they wanted nothing to do with quantitative easing either. The government just forced that money down their throats. Where was the “free market” in either of those instances?


#33

I actually like foreigners. I like foreign cultures and history. I read about them in my spare time.

But most immigrants and their kids vote for socialism. I want to live in a libertarian society. Until their voting patterns change, I have to choose between immigrants and liberty. No contest.


#34

Stephen Miller is a sniveling twit but that is the kindest of all the descriptions I would muster in describing him.

He’s a pseudo-intellectual spreading the virulent product of his diseased mind and the very definition of an anti-American nativist whose mission is to avert the horrors of the “browning” of the United States.

It’s the Buchanan canon repackaged in the alt-right lingo and filtered through the Luntzian spin mechanisms.

It’s the new racism and fascism.

And he needs a good ass-kicking to wipe that smirk off his face…


#35

This is an outrage. We should be importing people that can fill up our welfare lines. What are we gonna do with all this free housing we have? And having people speak the same language? CRAZY!

What’s next? Are we going to stop importing members of the worlds oldest hate group Islam? Unbelievable! :face_with_hand_over_mouth:


#36

@feddo isn’t it weird how we are told we have to base our immigration policy on a poem written in the early 1900s but when it comes to welfare policy, homosexuality, and taxes we can’t follow the policies of the early 1900s? It’s so confusing.


#37

Yes sir, especially ones from SOuth America