Should Marijuana Be Legal?


#101

The THC levels in recreational POT are incredibly high, hence the price.


#102

@rEVOLutionary_Minded @Patrol @Dan

Have you ever seen a licensed physician “prescribe” marijuana? On an actual legal prescription pad, and sign it?

If so, the Drug Enforcement Administration will be interested in talking to that physician: prescribing marijuana is ILLEGAL and grounds for license revocation. 21 U.S.C. § 811 et seq.


#103

Small studies show marijuana may help people with Crohn’s disease feel better, but experts remain skeptical.

You can obtain medical cannabis after being qualified for a certification.

Dependence and psychosis are some of the risks tied to marijuana use.

With medical marijuana becoming available in a growing number of states, patients with Crohn’s disease may wonder if they should give it a try. Research has suggested that the potentially therapeutic compounds in the plant could indeed help with symptoms, but experts recommend that patients proceed with caution. “There really isn’t data to tell us that it’s effective for Crohn’s disease,” says Mark Gerich, MD, assistant professor of gastroenterology and clinical director of the Crohn’s & Colitis Center at the University of Colorado in Aurora. Though people who use it often report improvement in pain or easing of diarrhea, there’s no objective evidence that marijuana actually reduces the gut inflammation that’s at the core of the disease. Here is what else you should know about using marijuana for Crohn’s.

Dr. Cheifetz thinks that there’s currently not enough data to prove that cannabis is an effective way of treating Crohn’s disease.

Waseem Ahmed, MD, internist with NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, shares this view, explaining that most studies on this topic have major flaws, such as small samples and brief follow-up periods.


#104

If so, the Drug Enforcement Administration will be interested in talking to that physician: prescribing marijuana is ILLEGAL and grounds for license revocation. 21 U.S.C. § 811 et seq.

While what you said is true, they (in NM) actually still “prescribe”. They fill out paperwork which is then sent to the “state”, and then a card is issued. So while they didn’t write it on a DEA script pad. They still are the ones that make the 'call".


#105

Since marijuana remains illegal under federal law, doctors do not write prescriptions for pot as they would for other types of medicine. Rather, they write recommendations stating that a patient will benefit from medical marijuana as a part of their overall plan of treatment.

Any licensed doctor in a state where medical marijuana is legal can write a recommendation for a patient — provided the patient’s condition is on the list of illnesses that can be legally treated with cannabis. Once the patient receives a recommendation, he or she can purchase weed, possess it, consume it and, in some states, even grow it themselves.

Once you receive your recommendation, you will need to find a dispensary that can provide you with the marijuana you need. You’ll need to bring the certification, as well as your medical marijuana card, in states that require it. You will also need to have your driver’s license or other form of picture ID ready to prove that you’re a resident of the state where you’re obtaining legal medical marijuana.


#106

A couple of points
Marijuana and its medicinal properties is not widely researched in large part because of US government drug policy that it has pushed all around the world. Medical research, even thought there appears to be mountains of anecdotal evidence that the many canabanoids that make up marijuana have a variety of positive medical properties… and yes, this even includes creating the munchies… It is a well known fact that cancer and its treatment suppresses the appetite and is counterproductive to rehabilitation and smoking pot stimulates the appetite. Yet federal control of the apparatus that allows even research facilities to grow cannabis stifles real legitimate investigation.

The way we look at most attempts at suppressing vices in the US are first of all really counter to our very own founding documents. Beyond that they often spawn the very behavior do gooders seek to inhibit and create underground markets to service it… The only good thing to come out of prohibition was NASCAR…

One can notice in Holland, Spain and Portugal that they don’t have marijuana mania… in Spain, they have almost eradicated the black market as it is legal to grow for personal consumption… In Germany children as young as 12 can drink beer in the company of their parents… they don’t have the alcoholism that we do in the US and the UK… Germany has no laws against public nudity but you don’t see them parading around in Times Square extorting money from tourists…

P.S… I don’t like beer… and I have an aversion to alcohol but I have, responsibly smoked an occasional joint for the better part of my life…

Conservatism can be blinded by its own sanctimony and a very real divergence from our founding documents…


#107

Know who they say is #1 in weed research??? Get ready… Israel…

https://www.marijuanadoctors.com/blog/medical-marijuana-research/countries-with-the-most-medical-marijuana-research

Wow, so do I. I am allergic to alcohol.
Everytime I drink it, I break out…
In handcuffs.


#108

Good article… the US looses out on so many opportunities with its rather pious and dare I say, anti American attitude to the ‘pursuit of happiness’. Hemp alone is a huge exploitable industry that will further drive down the cost of hard wearing fabrics and maybe even reinvigorate a textile industry (if we haven’t sold off all of our looms and lost completely our talents to weave)

It took me some time to wipe the tea from my immediate surrounding area… stop that !


#109

LONDON (Reuters) - People who smoke marijuana have a three times greater risk of dying from hypertension, or high blood pressure, than those who have never used the drug, scientists said on Wednesday.

The risk grows with every year of use, they said.

The findings, from a study of some 1,200 people, could have implications in the United States among other countries. Several states have legalized marijuana and others are moving toward it. It is decriminalized in a number of other countries.

“Support for liberal marijuana use is partly due to claims that it is beneficial and possibly not harmful to health,” said Barbara Yankey, who co-led the research at the school of public health at Georgia State University in the United States.

“It is important to establish whether any health benefits outweigh the potential health, social and economic risks. If marijuana use is implicated in cardiovascular diseases and deaths, then it rests on the health community and policy makers to protect the public.”

Marijuana is also sometimes used for medicinal purposes, such as for glaucoma.

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, was a retrospective follow-up study of 1,213 people aged 20 or above who had been involved in a large and ongoing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. In 2005–2006, they were asked if they had ever used marijuana.

For Yankey’s study, information on marijuana use was merged with mortality data in 2011 from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, and adjusted for confounding factors such as tobacco smoking and variables including sex, age and ethnicity.

The average duration of use among users of marijuana, or cannabis, was 11.5 years.

The results showed marijuana users had a 3.42-times higher risk of death from hypertension than non-users, and a 1.04 greater risk for each year of use.

There was no link between marijuana use and dying from heart or cerebrovascular diseases such as strokes.

Yankey said were limitations in the way marijuana use was assessed – including that researchers could not be sure whether people had used the drug continuously since they first tried it.

But she said the results chimed with plausible risks, since marijuana is known to affect the cardiovascular system.

“Marijuana stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, leading to increases in heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen demand,” she said.

Experts not directly involved in the study said its findings would need to be replicated, but already raised concerns.

“Despite the widely held view that cannabis is benign, this research adds to previous work suggesting otherwise,” said Ian Hamilton, a lecturer in mental health at Britain’s York University.

Reporting by Kate Kelland, editing by Jeremy Gaunt


#110

LOL- it’s also prescribed by MD’s for such debilitating horrors as writer’s cramp.


#111

Don’t worry they all take Adderall to over come writers block and to be ale to concentrate. It kicks the effects of Mary J, down the road :slight_smile:


#112

But it is not prescribed.

Since marijuana remains illegal under federal law, doctors do not write prescriptions for pot as they would for other types of medicine. Rather, they write recommendations stating that a patient will benefit from medical marijuana as a part of their overall plan of treatment.

Any licensed doctor in a state where medical marijuana is legal can write a recommendation for a patient — provided the patient’s condition is on the list of illnesses that can be legally treated with cannabis. Once the patient receives a recommendation, he or she can purchase weed, possess it, consume it and, in some states, even grow it themselves.

Once you receive your recommendation, you will need to find a dispensary that can provide you with the marijuana you need. You’ll need to bring the certification, as well as your medical marijuana card, in states that require it. You will also need to have your driver’s license or other form of picture ID ready to prove that you’re a resident of the state where you’re obtaining legal medical marijuana.